COASTAL ZONE AND CATCHMENT BOUNDARIES

Soon after the NSW Coastal Policy was released in 1998 a debate occurred at a coastal conference that the Government had misrepresented the boundary of the Coastal Zone. The mapped boundary did NOT include the natural coastal system based on river catchments. In essence the Zone was defined by a line 1km back from high water including lakes and rivers using the nearest cadastral boundary as the landward limit. Maps were prepared and gazetted. Inside that boundary certain statutory provisions prevailed based on legislated planning provisions. This boundary, with modifications and extensions, prevails today. Read More

Coastal Archaeology Revisited

Browsing in my local Berkelouw’s store last weekend a title on the fiction table struck me: “The Beach Caves”. Usually titles on that table bear no relation to the subject but a quick look and wow! The front page said this is “an archaeological thriller that has a real sense of lived experience”. Where I wondered, could it be: in UK or somewhere exotic? No, it is here in NSW. Read More

JUDITH WRIGHT - POET, COASTAL CONSERVATIONIST AND MUCH MORE

From time to time I return to the writing and work of Australians who have inspired me. One such person is the highly acclaimed poet, Judith Wright (1915-2000). Born into a privileged pastoral family of the New England region, she soon distanced herself from the conservative values of her family to help drive the “conservation” movement in Australia in its battle with the forces of “progress”. Read More

COASTAL STORIES FROM THE FIELD,1970-2020

Last week Australia Post successfully delivered a neat package from the USA in the form of Special Issue No 101 of the Journal of Coastal Research (2020). Although this issue has been out online for some months it was a great delight to see the hard copy. And what a magnificent volume it is. Read More

US COASTAL MANAGEMENT UNDER TRUMP

The election of Joe Biden as President will surely bring changes to ways of managing environmental issues at various scales in the USA. This has already been foreshadowed with the nominations for cabinet positions, including the role of John Kerry on climate change. Read More

2020: A COASTAL PERSPECTIVE

Many have used the term “unprecedented” to define 2020. Very few will lament its passing. Much has been written of its fires, Covid 19, political actions (or inactions), injustices and different ways of conducting business. Yes, it was exceptional and for those of us with coastal interests there was plenty to remember. Read More

EPBC ACT CHANGES –WILL THEY BE WORTH THE EFFORT?

Legislation before the Senate provides an opportunity to address declining environmental conditions in Australia. However, the emphasis has been on streamlining the approvals process and devolving federal powers to the states and territories. Unless changed, this legislation will mean that on-going causes of decline will continue and be exacerbated by forces of climate change. Read More

TWO JIMS—BOWLER AND COLEMAN

One of the pleasures of a professional life is to work with colleagues who contribute so much to Quaternary geology, geomorphology, and sedimentology. Two such colleagues are James Maurice Bowler and James Malcolm Coleman. Read More

AUSTRALIA UNDER THREAT—WHAT TO DO NEXT?

“The situation is hopeless. We must take the next step” (P. Casals). Unless there is a turn-around in global emissions, the planet is faced with a dire climate-driven future. Australia is recognised as a nation under great threat. Within one- or two-decades lifestyles and livelihoods will be forced to adapt to conditions never before experienced. Read More

SHORELINE RESPONSES TO SEA-LEVEL RISE

The topic of shoreline behaviour in relation to sea-level rise has long attracted debate. This is evident in recent publications and responses in the international literature regarding a paper published earlier this by Vousdoukas et al. on “Sandy coastlines under threat of erosion” in Nature Climate Change. Read More